Opinion/Editorials

Opinion/Editorials

For Marin motorists stuck in traffic headed for the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, reopening the long-closed third eastbound lane is already overdue.

The nightly backup stacks up traffic onto Highway 101, along Sir Francis Drake Boulevard and on San Rafael’s streets.

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Opinion/Editorials

For Marin motorists stuck in traffic headed for the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, reopening the long-closed third eastbound lane is already overdue.

The nightly backup stacks up traffic onto Highway 101, along Sir Francis Drake Boulevard and on San Rafael’s streets.

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Opinion/Editorials

A large coalition of "goo-goos" – Capitol jargon for reform groups such as Common Cause and the League of Women Voters – wants the Legislature to shine the light of disclosure on those who provide "dark money" for political campaigns.

The state's Fair Political Practices Commission also wants the Legislature to crack down on those who contribute, or launder, money through misleadingly named "committees" that cloak their identities.

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Opinion/Editorials

Sacramento is working on a $3.1 billion bond measure to fix its budget-beleaguered park system.

Assemblyman Marc Levine, chairman of the Assembly Water, Parks and Wildlife Committee, held a special hearing in San Rafael to help build awareness and detail the need for the bonds.

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Opinion/Editorials

San Rafael officials are taking a hard look at the city’s resale inspection program, which has drawn criticism for its uneven performance and that it takes too much time to complete.

The program wound up in the political target when Assemblyman Marc Levine, a former San Rafael councilman, asked the state auditor to review its performance. The state audit also included Novato and Pasadena.

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Opinion/Editorials

Mike Lehmkuhl’s descent from businessman and homeowner into insanity, homelessness and death on a chilly January afternoon should shock us all.

Lehmkuhl’s friends and family tried for years to intervene. But Sacramento’s law enforcement and mental health care workers failed to take the steps that might have brought him in from the cold. It’s an all-too-common dereliction.

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Opinion/Editorials

The U.S. Supreme Court's 2010 ruling in Citizens United vs. FEC opened the floodgates of corporate and special-interest election spending, but at least it underscored and promoted the importance of disclosure and transparency. Knowing the source of campaign money allows voters "to make informed decisions and give proper weight to different speakers and messages," the court wrote.

The ruling could be read as an invitation to Congress to expose political "dark money" to the light with stringent disclosure laws — but it's an invitation that Congress has yet to accept in any meaningful way.

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Opinion/Editorials

One of the biggest issues facing the 2016 election, aside from immigration reform, fixing the economy, and bringing jobs back to hard-working Americans, is gun control. It's quite the polarizing topic no matter which way you slice it. Do guns fall into the wrongs hands? Yes, and it's a part of life. Do we wish only the right kinds of people had possession of firearms? Absolutely. Nothing would please those in a democratic republic more than those responsibly carrying a weapon and using it when necessary. So, why does it seem that gun control reform is such a hot debate? Leave it to the state of California to show other states, in a sense, how to be a trailblazer.

Governor Jerry Brown took to his desk on Friday, July 1, and signed six new gun-control bills into law, while also vetoing five other bills that were passed by the State Legislature.

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Opinion/Editorials

Thank you IJ. Thank you columnist Dick Spotswood. Thank you Assemblyman Marc Levine.

Thank you all who have written in about the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge travesty.

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Opinion/Editorials

Studies show that the use of police body cameras is a net benefit when it comes to maintaining the peace and promoting public understanding on the many challenges of police work. Given recent heated public debate about excessive force by police, cameras are more a part of the solution than the problem.

A 2013 study by researchers at Cambridge University found a 50 percent reduction of force — either by a police officer or a respondent — when body cameras were present. Moreover, the airing of video, in many cases, can lead to better public understanding, such as the recent release of footage regarding a Sonoma County sheriff’s deputy who used force in subduing an 18-year-old during a routine stop in Petaluma.

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